Woolly Wonders!

img_0069I’ve wanted to get a new knitting group going for a little while.  A couple of the ones I had participated in over the past few years either fizzled, evolved into other things, or real life kicked all of our asses at once and have been on a very long hiatus.

Between work, knitting shenanigans, slowly enacting my plan for world domination, and strong introvert tendencies, social commitments can be difficult at times.  I think everyone is in the same boat paddling for time, so setting up a groups that meets the second Sunday of every month sounded like a good plan.  To toss in a bit more fun, why not move the knit up location every time? The group wouldn’t stress one location consistently.  That also allows us group folk to support more than one local business.  I’m also a huge fan of crafting in public, when it feels like most of the world is staring at a smart phone, stitching away in public seems like an act of social deviance.  We can all use a bit of that in our lives.

After creating one of those infamous event things on Facebook I crossed my fingers and hoped a few people would show up to Mocha Moe’s in Flowery Branch.  One person came somewhat by force because I kidnapped her.  That’s not entirely true but a funny visual.  Three more people came!  Is that a huge knitting group, no, but it’s a damn good start.  Deborah, Kelly, Lia, DeAna, and myself had a good afternoon filled with knitting, coffee, and a few laughs.

We’re doing this again on March 11th at 1:00pm – 3:00pm at Left Nut Brewery in Gainesville, GA.  Keep an eye out for one of those event things, with the set up at the brewery I’m going to need a head count so I can beg them to reserve us one of the bench tables a few days in advance.

If you’re in Northeast Georgia feel free to drop on by.  Woolly Wonders (that name may change eventually) is meant to be open to anyone who enjoys any fiber craft; knitting, crochet, needlepoint, or anything else requiring fiber to make, with a welcoming spirit.  I hope for a diverse group of women and men, of all ages, walks of life, and skill levels.

We have very few rules.  Please leave the political debate at home, it has destroyed too many crafting groups over the years, and treat others respectfully.

There is no obligation to come every month.  There’s no rigid structure here, simply come and spend some time working with some crafty people.

All of us will have one thing in common, our love of fiber craft, everything else can be built on from there.

Knit your bit! Socks, WWI, and the Next Generation of Knitters

Yesterday, (April 8) a couple of fantastic knitters any myself combined forces to participate in an Family Day event at the Northeast Georgia History Center.   The History Center presented Over There: America Enters World War I, to commemorate the Centennial Anniversary of the United States entry into “The Great War” with living history interpretation and hands on activities.

img_0739So what does knitting have to do with WWI?

Quite a lot!  Knitting was more than a hobby during wartime.  It was an act of patriotism!  Thousands if not millions of women and children in Allied countries used their knitting needles as weapons of war.  What were they knitting? Socks.  Lots of socks. Millions of socks, to prevent a horrid condition called trench foot.  Take a moment, and google that, I’ll wait…….okay welcome back, and I’m a little sorry for the images that may be burned into your retinas.  Trench warfare was often wet and muddy, and the boots soldiers wore were not fully waterproof, or leaked like sieves.  Fresh dry socks were needed to keep trench foot at bay.  Knitters not only made socks but sweaters, vests, gloves, balaclavas and scarves, in attempts to keep soldiers warm.

Sock knitting hasn’t changed greatly in 100 years, many of us still use double pointed needles to create them.  More recent methods include knitting them on circular needles.  The patterns needed for soldiers were fairly simple, and had nothing fancy included.  Many of the free, top down patterns with heel flap constructions that you see on Ravelry (knitting heaven for the uninitiated) or how-to knitting sites, are very similar to the patterns used by WWI knitters.  These millions of hand-knit, no frill,  socks were collected by the Red Cross in the US, inspected, fixed by more experienced knitters if necessary, loaded up and sent to the military for issue.

So three brave souls did some research, packed up our socks and goodies from our favorite local yarn store, Yarn Rhapsody, started making historically accurate patterns to work on while at the event, and set up shop at the History Center.

 

I believe the three of us were left amazed by the interest our little tables drew in.  We had set up a bit of yarn on straight needles to show children how to knit a few stitches, the three stations we set up stayed full for the entire event.  One child would finish their row, and the next would sit down, occasionally an adult would make their first attempts.  Some of these children were knitting prodigies from the moment they sat down and learned the mechanics of their first knit stitch.  We had a blast showing the next generation of future knitters that they were capable of learning this craft.  At the end of the day, the three of us packed up, and left exhausted, we had no idea we would be so busy.  I’m hoping to see a few of these children pop up again with needles and yarn in hand.

 

 

Knitting in the News: Political Craftivism

Let me begin with a disclaimer, that will apply to this post as well as any possibly politically charged issue that may be referenced on this blog in the future.

With the election and inauguration of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States, our population has begun to very openly express their political opinions, be it leftist, rightist, or down the middle.  For the purposes of this blog, I will strive to keep my own personal political beliefs out of the conversation and remain as neutral as possible.  I ask that any comments that  a politically themed post may generate remain respectful to anyone that may read them.  Comments are moderated, anything I deem offensive, crude, or an attack on another will be deleted. 

It’s 10 days after the inauguration of Donald Trump, and your local yarn shop is probably still a bit low on pink yarn.  By now, everyone knows about the “pussy hat” worn at the women’s marches around the county in response to the inauguration and comments of an offensive sexual nature that were brought to light during campaign season.

This week the brain beanie is on the rise (more pink yarn) to support those in the sciences that are being gagged.

Craftivism, is defined as the practice of engaged creativity, especially regarding political or social causes to bring about change via personalized activism.

I am in love with the concept of craftivism.  The idea of physically making something takes  time, energy, and dedication, more so than picking up something from the store pre-made.  The pussy hat (and I cringe using that word, my southern great-grandmother is rolling in her grave, and I would consider her a feminist) is certainly not the first act of craftivism but it certainly is the most well-known public example.

womens-march-on-washingtonPolitical viewpoints aside, I encourage you to check out the photos of the men and women wearing these hats, there are hundreds, if not a few thousand examples floating around.  You’ll find some obvious first-time knit and crochet projects out there.  How many new crafters were born out of this act political activism?  How many will get bitten by the yarn bug and will begin other projects?  In a culture where the average attention span has been reported to be 8 seconds; it’s amazing so many people were introduced to a skill that requires concentration and focus.  It’s healthy!

Love it or hate it, the pussy hat may have started another revolution.  Despite our own personal viewpoints on reason for this mass act of craftivism, crafters should be encouraging newcomers.  Not pushing them away because of their viewpoint.

I’m saddened by the reaction of several local yarn shops that have publicly stated that they are not interested in selling yarn that will be used in possible future acts of craftivism.  Shop owners have the right to do as they please, but it makes little to no sense to push aside customers for political views.

All I know is this crafter is more than happy to see more acts of craftivism, and am more than happy to teach that first-timer how to work that yarn around needles or hooks to make their statement.