Plants, Purls & Puppies

125D89B9-15C6-4A3D-B3D0-9AB7ACE40725Well folks, once again, it’s been far too long since my last update.  I’m trying to get better about this.  Really.  I promise.   Spring is already beginning to give way into summer and my list of projects at the house seems to continue to grow. A lot of my free time is spent out in the yard these days attempting to shape it into something presentable to the public and more importantly a place I’ll enjoy over the years to come.  It wasn’t horrible to begin with, it was just bare, and I’m not the type of person to have only grass.  The focus has been on planting perennials and shrubs and building out the beds to put them in.  The work I did earlier this spring is starting to show with blooms here and there.  If someone told me this time last year that I would leave the world of rented apartments and duplexes and have my own little house, I would have laughed at them.

Pints_and_PurlsThe crafting projects are still being worked on but not at the pace that I’ve burned through them in the past.  I have a hunch this will pick back up in the fall and winter.  I’m still getting at lest an hour in a day.  It’s important to me to work that little bit of knitting time in for sanity’s sake.  It’s my meditation time.  I’ve still got a sweater for a friend to finish, my own sweater, and a handful of other projects in various states.  There’s also some good news locally, a few of us are trying to get a Friday evening craft meet up rolling again.  It’s called Pints and Purls and we meet up at Downtown Drafts on the Gainesville, GA square.  Now, I know, there are a few other craft groups out there named Pints and Purls, but hey, it’s a perfect name for a group that meets for an adult beverage with yarn in hand.  I guess if there’s an official organization somewhere, consider the Gainesville, GA chapter established. If you are in the area feel free to drop on in around 6pm on Fridays.  We won’t be hard to find, there will be a table with fidgeting fingers and balls of yarn.

fullsizeoutput_150And lastly, in this brief update.
SANDOR!
Now this is my favorite long term project.  Sandor, the lab/mystery dog mix, is about 8 months old now and has accomplished making me laugh every single day.  We’re still working on puppy exuberance issues, but overall he’s a damn good dog…well as long as you don’t ask my cat Severus.  Severus is still pissed that a dog has invaded his sanctuary.  Lucious, the more forgiving cat, on the other hand, will play with him like he was another dog.  Sandor and Lu also have an odd afternoon ritual, where they will snuggle up near each other on the couch and before the urge to nap takes over, Lu will wash Sandor’s face.  Sandor used to fight his daily face washing as a tiny puppy but he seems to have grown to enjoy it.

That’s it for the moment.  I’m alive, well, and happy.  How are you guys doing? Fill me in.

 

 

Fledgling Fair – Georgia Mountain Needle Arts Festival

Things are finally settling back into some sort of routine that actually involves time for me to work needles and fiber through my fingers, and that makes me really happy camper.

rf0r2Through a bit of magic and a bit of telling my boss I was taking the morning off on Friday, I drove the hour over to the Georgia Mountain Needle Arts Festival in Ellijay. Ellijay is worth a drive on its own, especially during the fall when all the apple orchards are open and in full swing.

2019 was the sophomore year for the Needle Arts Festival, which is an important point to mention.  This is still a fledgling fiber fair, with the potential to grow into something pretty amazing.  This year featured around 18 vendors, a mixed bag of local yarn shops, independent dyers/spinners, and a smidge of other fiber related businesses.  For a fair of this size it was a pretty good selection, however, I feel as years go by there will be more independent makers.  This may come across as overly critical, but it’s not my intent, if I wanted to purchase main stream yarns like Berroco, Malibrigo, and Plymouth I would drive to the nearest yarn shop.  It is my opinion, for the fair to be successful and continue to grow the LYS presence will eventually have to drop off since they represented around a quarter of the vendors in attendance.  I would have been less critical of the LYS presence if they bought in more of the unique vendors and products that they carry in their stores. LYS owners will now probably beat me over the head, I know they struggle too.

Will I be back next year, of course, the balance will eventually improve and my hunch is this will be an excellent festival to support local dyers and spinners from the southeast.

What did I come home with? Well, I went on a mission for gadgets and unique products since I have more yarn than I can shake a stick at, so of course I purchase more yarn. Of the independent vendors, two really caught my eye.  Cameo Yarns and Stony Hill Fiber Arts.

ZB+JqyziSvCEk5X%XaDdcgCameo Yarns is a northwest Georgia dyer that had a booth full of absolutely gorgeous colorways that claims their inspiration is found in both the complex beauty of nature and the bright and tarnished aspects of the big city.  There was certainly some natural inspiration in the colorway Rainbow Trout.  If you ever catch a rainbow trout in the sunlight they are a surprisingly colorful fish in the often muddy waterways they around found in.  I came home with two skeins of their Oh So Charming Sock – so all the beautiful fishy color without all the icky fishy smell.  I don’t have a project in mind for it yet, but eventually the right pattern will call its name.

Stony Hill Fiber Arts also had some eye catching goodies for sale. They produce Pacolet img_3500Valley Cotton Yarns.  I’ve not been a huge fan of many cottons over the years, too many feel too rigid for garments and accessories unless they are heavily blended with another fiber, or I’m just too impatient to wait for the cotton to soften over time and use.  The Pacolet Valley yarns are cotton and cottina – which is a cotton processed in a way to accept color more efficiently – and it feels incredibly soft on the skeins and so smooth in the samples they had on hand.  Stony Hill also had patterns on featuring their yarns.  These fiber beauties are already assigned to projects.  The natural colored cotton in the back is going to be knitted into a wide brimmed summer hat – probably sooner than later, my pale self needs to be more conscious of sun exposure, and the lovely colored yarns in the front of the photo will be turned into fair isle fingerless mitts.

I walked in the door with a definitive budget and stayed within it.  I definitely could have spent so much more at the other independents featured at the festival but hopefully they’ll return for another year.

All in all….if you’re within driving distance of Ellijay, Georgia and want to support a growing entity, check this festival out next spring.