The Word of the Day is Namaste

Back a long, long time ago, in a galaxy far away I wrote a review of the Namaste Train Case and Buddy Case. Overall, they are holding up well and were good purchases but with some and travel a small update is warranted.

The Train Case is a great idea in theory and does work well for car travel, and knitting sessions outside of the home, but after flying with it twice there’s a downside, unless you fly first class and have enough leg room to move that case in and out from under the seat in front of you it may not be the best choice as your small carry on.  I would still call it a great purchase but limited on air travel.  The designers certainly put a lot of thought into making it flight friendly but in actual use it misses the mark.  That Buddy Case though…worth every single penny, and maybe a bit more.  That little box is within reach every time I knit, I just have to toss my scary looking scissors out of there before I get to the security checkpoint at the airport.  They look more like a hand wrought tool of torture than a snips.

87900Large_34b9After the train case missed the mark on its airplane suitability I went back to looking for something a little easier to work with.  I fly several times a year and have the attention span of a gnat unless I’m making something with my hands or working, so this is one of those oddly important things to me. I saw the Namaste Maker’s Foldover Bag and thought, hey this could work.  Not going to lie, the numbers on that price tag burned a little bit, but I’ve been looking for not only airplane friendly but everyday carry bags that could accommodate my daily stuff and a project on the go.

I’m not a tiny purse type. I either have a good amount of stuff I like to have access to when I need it, or I just put my wallet and keys in my pocket. It’s always one extreme or the other.

The requirements are:

  • Can it comfortably fit a tablet and my beast of a planner – yep, I’m still running on an old school paper one.
  • Organization pockets – Bags that are just giant open caverns on the inside make my skin crawl.
  • Heavy material – My stuff needs to take a beating. Things that easily rip, or scuff do not stand a chance.
  • Can it squish under a seat if I need it to. 

So the Maker’s Foldover Bag met all of those requirements on paper.  I’ve had it for a two months now, and it’s survived a few flights and regular abuse at home, it’s withstanding the beating.  It holds all the daily stuff – keys, wallet, planner, small notebook, sunscreen (don’t leave home without it) and all the other stuff you would likely find in a woman’s handbag.  On a trip to California I had two projects crammed in, a not so tiny shawl, and socks. A third project probably could have been comfortably stuffed in but project overkill does exist.  It will also hold my beast of a tablet.

I’ve finally found a single knitting/daily gear bag that travels well and looks professional if I happen to have a situation where I’m going to be meeting with someone related to my job. Considering the abuse it’s taken as a travel bag I expected a scuff or two by now and I have two small marks on the sewn corners of the strap at the high points.  No one would notice unless it was pointed out so I declare it has passed the heavy material requirement. I could see after a few years of service the high points in other places being scuffed and the backing material underneath the “vegan leather” showing through, unfortunately that’s white in color, but I would be surprised if I saw wear or scuffing though the body of the bag itself. Your mileage will probably be better, I’m hard on bags. (Let’s not discuss what my luggage looks like these days or the fact I just had to replace my carry on roller-board because it was cracking in bad, bad, places.) The interior of the bag has a built in project bag dead center in the main compartment, making three large areas in the bottom of the bag and then there are multiple smaller pockets throughout the center, leaving enough space for the top to fold over if it’s not packed to the brim.

There are few negatives to this bag and anything I would call out as a negative would be pure knit-picking, but there are things worth noting.  It’s a physically heavy bag.  When I pulled it out of the shipping box I was surprised by the weight.  It’s also a beast as far as size!  The measurements are accurate in the description at Jimmy Beans, but until you see it in person it doesn’t sink in.  For me these aren’t issues, but for others that have handled the bag those two things are almost always mentioned as potential downsides.

Is it worth the investment, yes, if you’re an oddball like me that really wants both access to crafting and daily gear all in one place.  If you’re just a casual knitter that doesn’t have the compulsive need to keep an active project with you at all times, I would lean towards no, and that opinion is centered from the idea that unless you plan on using it often, that amount of money is better spent on yarn or other crafting tools.

Got any questions about things I may not have mentioned, just toss them into the comments and I’ll answer as quickly as I can.

Disclaimer: The products referenced in this review have been purchased with my own funds and have not been biased in anyway by the maker or seller. However, if you are interested in a product review, I’ll happily try your product if you’ll send it my way, and review it fairly.

 

Knitting Goodies – Namaste Train Case

I’m a huge fan of buying a gift for myself sometime during my birthday month.  It may seem a wee bit selfish, but I chalk it up to a self-care.

Being the knitting junky that I am, I saw the Namaste Knitter’s Train Case and my reaction was an instant ooooooooohhhhhhhh pretty, it may have been the dark teal that caught my eye.  I’ve seen Namaste’s products throughout the years and considered them a little too girly for my taste.  I’m more utilitarian than I am “fancy”.  This particular case came out last October, so it has been on the market for a little while and in general has had good reviews.  My case arrived this afternoon, and I’m glad I gifted this to myself. My initial impressions are it’s well designed, beautiful,  well made, and a good choice for a knitting tool.

This case will be great for long-term projects that require the entire arsenal of tools it would take to complete it…think sweaters, multi-color work, or intricate lace work.  The train case is designed for knitters on the move.  I may be traveling less this year (I hope) but this case is designed with travelers in mind.  The size will easily fit under the airplane seat (honestly, it’ll fit under most seats or floorboards in typical travel situations) in front of you, or on the tray table when you are allowed to have it down. It will also travel well to your local coffee shop, knit shop, or pub for those knitting sessions with friends.  The magnetic closure on the front is solid, and it holds a surprising amount of yarn and goodies. Currently, I’ve loaded up the 2nd sleeve of a sweater I’m working on, tools in the included mesh bag, a Namste Buddy Case (more info below) and 5 caked skeins of yarn, and a ChiaoGoo needle set. I could cram more in, but didn’t feel the urge to stuff it full. As soon as that second sleeve is finished, I’ll be able to roll right into the body of the sweater without having to hunt for anything.  When opened, the lid easily accommodates holding a pattern with a few included magnets for easy access on the go, or you can work with the case lid closed and feed yarn through a U-shaped hole on the side, perfect for those long periods of mindless stockinette or garter stitch knitting. I can see this as a solution to the crazy bag lady problem a lot of us knitters have, just load everything you need for your WIP into this case and go, leave the bag for the tools, the bag for the extra yarn, and the bag for the project itself at home.

As far as pricing, it’s not the cheapest knitting case, but it’s the most reasonably priced online, as far as reputable sellers go, over at Jimmy Beans.  If your local yarn shop has a few of these on hand, please consider buying from them instead of online.  The case is constructed of vegan leather, which looks better than I imaged it would after it arrived, and includes the magnets to hold a pattern to the lid, a darning needle, and a button closed pouch for all the little things that you wouldn’t want running wild.  I ordered the matching  Namaste Buddy Case as well.  I’ve had a little tin case that I put stitch markers, and tools in for a while, but it always seemed small and for lack of a better phrase, a complete clusterfuck on the inside.  Once again, this case includes magnets to hold finishing needles, a small tin for markers, and other goodies.  Both pieces seem to be constructed to handle regular use and abuse.

So what is the first project to be worked out of this Train Case? I just finished the Mitali Shawl referenced in a previous post with the exception of blocking….a blocking day is in the near future….so it was time to kick back into the sweater I promised to make for a friend.  She bought the yarn and I’m doing the work, and yes, she is absolutely knit worthy.  The pattern is called Seachange by Jennifer Steingass and I’m working it up in Berroco Quechua (yak, alpaca, and wool blend).  The pattern called for a DK weight but I dropped down to a sport weight and made a few minor adjustments to the pattern.  I want the recipient to be able to wear this sweater more than the one freakishly cold day we get a year in Georgia, and even though the difference between DK and sport weight yarns are minor there’s just enough difference in weight it can make a considerable difference in how warm this sweater will be.  So far, so good, I’ve finished sleeve one, and well into sleeve two after having to pull out a few times and adjust needle size for not only gauge but color work.  Stranded knitting hasn’t always been my strongest point.

I’ve included a few photos of the Namaste Train Case and Buddy Case with tools and yarn included so there’s an idea about how much these two goodies hold, as well as the organization it can provide.  I hope this Train Case and Buddy Case will be part of my knitting tool arsenal for quite a while.

 

Disclamer: I am not compensated for my brief review of this product or seller. This is an unbiased opinion of a knitting/yarn product. If you have a knit related product that you would like for me to try, please feel free to reach out anytime. 

Last but not least, the coffeeandwool.com domain name will continue to remain active instead of this blog reverting to it’s original WordPress address for another year, an anonymous donor insisted on paying the renewal fees for WordPress as well as the domain name, with the condition that I update more often, so that those that enjoy this blog will continue to have easy access.