When Crafting Gets Political

If you missed it earlier today, Ravelry, a resource a great many crafters use to find patterns, ideas, and other crafters drew a line in the sand.

To make a long story short, leave your support of Trump and his administration off of Ravelry.  If you want to read the full announcement you can find it here.  It’s been one of the biggest political moves I’ve seen in the crafting world, period.

I was surprised by the move, but will admit I’ve not been surprised by the reactions I’ve seen in other crafting groups I follow online, responses to the policy seem to be firmly in one camp or the other.   The political climate in the good ol’ US of A has been more than a little tense the past few years.  I try to make it a point to keep my own political beliefs off of Coffee and Wool and it’s associated facebook page unless a craft related event warrants it, and even then, I do my best to remain neutral.  Which, believe me, can be pretty difficult somedays. I’m not politically neutral in my non-crafting life.

Overall, I’m not a huge fan of heated political discussion getting involved in a medium I use to relax and use as a form of thoughtful meditation.  It’s just a good way to ruin a good thing, but there is a great many people that use fiber art in many forms to express their political beliefs.  Art in any form has a lot to do with personal preference and expression.

The most recent example that a lot of us saw, made, or where asked to make where the “pink pussy hats”.  There’s absolutely nothing wrong with craftivism or crafting your political viewpoint, I’m all for it if that’s your thing.

What a lot of people tend to forget when it comes to membership in large social networking forums like Ravelry, Facebook, Twitter, etc., that they are entities that are making their own rules and those rules can evolve as needed.  We all sign ToS agreements (that very few of us read) that all have legal language along the lines that our posts can be moderated on whatever terms the site choses.

If you find yourself disagreeing with the new Ravelry policy and don’t feel like you can further participate within those realms, you have the option to collect your patterns, download your site data and move on.  If you find yourself celebrating the new policy, carry on as normal.  But I feel like the point needing to be stressed that ad hominem  attacks on fellow crafters for falling one way or another does little to help ease tensions.  We are unique in the fact that we are such an amazingly diverse group that has a single element that unites us.

So the big question here is, did Ravelry make a mistake with this announcement?

Yes, no, maybe?  Yeah I know, I’m not a help at all here.  Go back and read that part where I would like to politically neutral. The best answer here is, time will tell. The crafting community is incredibly diverse.  There will be a noticeable percentage of people that will walk away from Ravelry over this new rule.  Will it be enough that advertising slows?  Is there a chance advertisers will pull their own sponsorship? Maybe.

A lot of us American’s are a little too tense these days.  Maybe we should just pick up our yarn, master our craft, and be the better example and keep things civil.

Update: Much like the sites I’ve listed above having rules about what can and can’t be said, this blog also has some very basic guidelines.  I moderate the comments, and anything I deem inappropriate or down right spam gets rejected. There’s only been two that I’ve rejected and one of those was on this post.

I was rather rudely told to “check my privilege” and my crafting history over the comments I made in the rest of this post.  I’m going to address it very quickly.  There is a long and beautiful history of knitting participating in politics, codes and information have been hiding in hand crafted items for centuries.  There are thousands of objects created that have a clear political stance.  I’ve always supported those that have chosen to express their political views despite how I feel about where they fall on the political spectrum.  I expressed that support in the main text as well.  Read things before you jump down someone’s throat.

I’m far from blind or ignorant of the discussions regarding racism and white privilege within the fiber arts and crafting communities that spawned from instagram posts and into broader mediums.

Bottom line, this crafter has chosen not to express her political viewpoint on a blog or on a facebook page.  The rest of my life is affected by political choices and the ideologies of others being forced on me wether I agree or not, crafting is the one realm where I can reject that influence and I intend to keep doing so. It does not mean I remain silent on political topics in the rest of my life.

The greater goal of Coffee and Wool is to share information, encourage fiber artists new and old, and remind people that crafting can have an amazing impact on one’s life by being a medium for meditation, relaxation, and at times socialization. I cannot have a public political stance and have those goals for this ongoing project. I won’t alienate people that way.

Weekends Unplugged

I hit a little bit of a breaking point yesterday.  Unfortunately, when I get stuck in a weather cycle that includes days of rain and thunderstorms I’ll inevitably develop a migraine and end up way more agitated over the smallest things than any human should be.  That was yesterday for me.  I skipped out on an event I had full intentions of going to, told everyone I was turning off my phone and hiding out until Monday.

I’m at the house, still in my PJs fresh from a long nap, uninterrupted by a house filled with bleeps and bloops. I spent the morning knitting and watching a couple of movies, dived into a book for a while, you know, the stuff introverty type people enjoy when they’ve finally hit their wall.

Silence is never an option in our lives, but it’s almost jarring when you notice just how often some bit of technology is making sounds and demanding your attention so often.

As much as I love technology’s ability to keep us all connected there are times I wish it wasn’t so simple.  There are days that a text message notification makes me want to throw my phone across the room.  It’s usually someone just typing the word “hi” as an opener to pry into the rest of my day, and at times that feels so intrusive it will make me angry. Then god forbid you don’t reply fast enough, there are people that insist on continuing the intrusion again by either texting again or calling with ‘is everything okay you didn’t answer?’ causing further annoyance.  It’s probably just a quirky introvert issue, but it’s still an issue.  It also is likely a failure on my part to place boundaries on the repeat offenders.  I felt it a little sad that I had to announce on a certain social media page that I need a quiet day, and even then, that isn’t fully respected by some.  I’ve picked up my phone twice today to see a handful of messages from people that obviously didn’t see or willfully ignored my request for a quiet day, and a few that were legitimately passing along info that I needed for the week that knew I wouldn’t be responding.

So yes, I’m bitching a bit, so on to other things.

An unplugged weekend may turn into a permanent affair.  When I see that usage stats notification come through on my phone, my skin crawls and I feel utterly disappointed with myself.  Despite feeling like I don’t waste a great deal of time dicking around on my phone, the actual numbers say otherwise.  I waste 15-20 hours a week on a tiny screen that does nothing to improve my life.  I should be wasting that time reading, crafting, sleeping (poking at a screen until the wee hours happens more than I like), learning something new, actually going out and doing something, on and on and on.  I’ve also been struggling with feeling like the weekends are stolen by chores and errands.  Maybe reclaiming some of those 15-20 hours a week and actually taking care of things would give me the weekends back.

rs_560x415-150107143918-1024.Oregon-Trail-Game-MS-Dos.jl.010715I’m feeling a little nostalgic of my early adulthood years. I’m an Xennial, the Oregon Trail generation, that odd little age group that doesn’t quite fit Gen X or the Millennials. In fact, being called a millennial at times feels like an insult.  I remember the dark ages before the internet and before everyone had a cell phone in their pocket. At 18 there was access to the internet, cell phones were finally getting to pocket sized, texting was an option for those of us that didn’t feel the need to get drawn into a phone conversation, and those were brief (T9 was a bitch), and social media wouldn’t begin to become a factor in our lives until 2003.  I’m not going to lie, there’s been a few times today when I’ve fought the urge to check the social media networks to see what’s going on.  It’s not a secret that I’ve felt social media holds too much real estate in our minds, and I’ve struggled with the idea of disconnecting from it entirely.  I haven’t because I feel like there is actually risk that I would lose contact with people I care about because they are so entrenched, that contacting others outside FB, twitter, instagram and the myriad of others is no longer on their radar.

So if I feel forced to participate I can at least have better control of it.  I’m going to experiment for a bit, beginning Friday nights after I get in for the evening I’ll log out of the whole mess until Monday morning.  But that all comes down to one thing, do I have the self control to keep it up, or am I too sucked into this mess to do it on a routine basis. This is were it all wraps up today.  I’m going to go cook a nice dinner, and go back to the book I’m reading.  What do you guys think? Am I alone in feeling this way, or is this a problem for you too?